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The Negro Leagues

  17 Lots       »   




Lot 9.  Negro Leagues Players Association Bat Signed by 27 – Leonard, Jethroe, Fields, Manning, Etc. From the Wilmer Fields collection, this 34” Adirondack 302 bat displays the mostly nm-m 8 and better autographs of Hall of Fame first baseman Buck Leonard, 1950 N.L. Rookie of the Year Sam Jethroe, Bert Simmons, Sammie Harris, Emilio “Millito” Navarro, Gene Smith, Wilmer Fields, Mahlon Duckett, Gene Benson, Max Manning, Jimmy Dean, Sherwood Brewer, Elbert Israel, Russell Awkard, Cowan “Bubba” Hyde, Josh Gibson Jr., Armando Vazquez, Curly Williams, Jose A Figueroa, Rudy Fernandez, Jim Cohen, Leroy Ferrell, Stanley Glenn, Wilmer Harris, Gordon “Hoppy” Hopkins, Al Wilmore and Larry Kimbrough. With Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson, Leonard was one of the first three Negro Leagues players inducted into the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown. On April 18, 1950, Jethroe became the first African American to play for the Boston Braves. Fields was the ace of the Homestead Grays pitching staff in the 1940s and regularly hit above .300 as a position player. He passed away in 2004. Kevin Keating authenticated the autographs. The signed bat is nm-m and outstanding for display.
Winning Bid $152     


Lot 10.  Aug. 1942 “Spot” Magazine with Multiple Excellent Photos of Josh Gibson. The Negro Leagues’ Babe Ruth is the subject of a four-page extensively illustrated spread in this 10.5” x 13.5” magazine. One of the black & white photos occupies a full page. Satchel Paige called Gibson “the greatest hitter who ever lived,” and Walter Johnson considered him to be a better catcher than Bill Dickey. But Gibson never had a chance to play in the majors. Three months before Jackie Robinson made his debut in the majors, Gibson died from a brain tumor at the age of 35. The magazine is ex. The cover subject is Janis Carter, who appeared in more than 30 movies, including “Flying Leathernecks” with John Wayne.
Winning Bid $35     


Lot 269.  Very Scarce Issue of “Our Sports” Edited by Jackie Robinson – Satchel Paige Cover. This short-lived magazine, which lasted only five issues in 1953, covered sports from an African-American perspective. Edited by the Brooklyn Dodgers’ barrier buster, it was variously identified as “The Negro’s Own Sports Magazine” and “A Great New Negro Sports Magazine.” This issue is the fourth of five, from August 1953. Paige alone is pictured on the front cover, which presents headlines, including “Let’s Put Satchel Paige in the Hall of Fame.” Robinson is pictured in an advertisement inside the front cover. Articles cover Moses Walker, “the 1st Negro in organized baseball”; golf champion Teddy Rhodes, who was barred from PGA events because of his race; boxers Jersey Joe Walcott, Sugar Ray Robinson and Floyd Patterson; bicycle racing champion Major Taylor; and future major league outfielder Dave Pope. In an article he wrote, Robinson addresses the question “Have I Achieved My Goal?” This copy of the 66-page magazine is ex-m to nm and is not marred by a label. No sports publications collection could be complete without at least one example of this ground-breaking magazine!
Winning Bid $75     


Lot 270.  1955 Original RC Cola Ad with the Dodgers’ Jim Gilliam Prepared for “Negro Newspapers.” In 1953, Gilliam was Rookie of the Year as the Brooklyn Dodgers’ second baseman. One of the team’s more popular players, he appears in an ad saying that “RC is the cola I drink because RC tastes so good!” This display version of the ad is 11 ½” x 17 ¼” on newsprint. Dated June 28, 1955, the ad was prepared by the New York ad firm Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn. The paper shows creases in the upper left and lower right and some edge tears. They could easily be matted out to display 8” x 11.5” image area, which is nm.
Winning Bid $10     


Lot 277.  Bobbing Heads of Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson (2) and 10 Cards with Negro Leaguers. The Josh Gibson bobbing heads are from 1963. In one, he wears the uniform of the Homestead Grays, and in the other, the Pittsburgh Crawfords. A 2006 bobber has Paige with the Crawfords. The bobbing head of Gibson with the Crawfords has a tiny chip on the left ear and a chip almost 1” long in the back of his neck. The two others are nm-m. The 6” x 8” color cards have Michael Mellett illustration of Bene Benson, Oscar Charleston, Leon Day, Toots Ferrell, Gibson, Judy Johnson, Buck Leonard, Buck O’Neil, Spotswood Poles and Jackie Robinson. Nm.
Winning Bid $50     


Lot 303.  Cool Papa Bell Display Panel from the MCI National Sports Gallery. This 5.5” x 16.5” display includes a black & white photo and an overview of Bell’s Hall of Fame career. According to the text, titled simply “COOL PAPA”: “Often called the fastest player ever, James ‘Cool Papa’ Bell scored from first base on a bunt, and in 1933 reportedly stole 175 bases in a 200-game season. Satchel Paige, who roomed with him on road trips, claimed, ‘Bell could flip off a light switch and be in bed before the room got dark.’ Besides being the fastest runner, Bell was a solid hitter, batting over .400 in a few seasons.” The panel is from the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. Ex-m to nm. The panel comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center.
Winning Bid $25     


Lot 304.  Rube Foster Exhibit Display from the MCI National Sports Gallery. The panel, 5.5" x 16.5”, has an excellent black & white 9.75"-tall die-cut photo of the former barnstorming pitcher who organized the Negro National League in 1920. For his contributions to black baseball, he was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1981, 51 years after his passing. Text on the panel reads: “FOSTERING A LEAGUE - Andrew ‘Rube’ Foster, star barnstorming pitcher at age 17, was an imposing 6-foot-4, 210 pounds. A standout on several teams, he claimed four of five wins when the Cuban X Giants, in 1903, won the ‘colored championship of the world.’ Playing for Chicago’s Leland Giants in 1910, he took over management of the team. In 1920 Foster organized the Negro National League, becoming its president and secretary, and receiving five percent of its gate receipts as his salary.” Ex-m, the panel is from the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center. The panel comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner.
Winning Bid $20     


Lot 305.  MCI Sports Gallery Display with Bud Fowler – First Black Player on a White Pro Team. To protect himself from the slashing spikes of white players, Fowler invented shin guards. The 5.5” x 16.25” panel has a b&w photo of Fowler with his teammates. Text reads: “SPITE & SPIKES - Bud Fowler, as the first black player on a white professional team, proved the adage that necessity is the mother of invention. He invented shin guards because white players often slashed him with their spikes. The all-around player - catcher, first baseman and pitcher - first played for a club in New Castle, Penn., in 1872. Always replaced as soon as a qualified white player came along, he played for 14 teams in nine leagues.” The panel is from the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the National Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. The panel comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner. It is ex-m with a couple of scratches on the plaque. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center. Fowler was also the first black player in organized baseball, playing in the International Association in 1978.
Winning Bid $10     


Lot 306.  Josh Gibson Exhibit Panel from the MCI National Sports Gallery. One of baseball’s top 20 players of all time, Gibson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972 with Satchel Paige and Buck Leonard. The display panel, 5.5" x 16.25” has a 7" die-cut b&w photo of Gibson. Text reads: “HIT IT ‘A MILE’ - Josh Gibson, who Satchel Paige called ‘the greatest hitter who ever lived,’ reportedly hit more than 75 home runs in 1931 for the Homestead Grays. Walter Johnson said Gibson ‘hits the ball a mile…catches so easy he might as well be in a rocking chair….throws like a rifle.’ Gibson joined the Grays when their catcher was injured during the first game played in Pittsburgh under artificial lights. He became the Grays’ starter, then later joined the Pittsburgh Crawfords.” The panel is from the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. Ex-m with a couple of small scratches. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center. The panel comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner.
Winning Bid $35     


Lot 307.  Buck Leonard Display from the MCI National Sports Gallery. Leonard, his Homestead Grays teammate Josh Gibson, and Satchel Paige were the first players from the Negro Leagues inducted into the Hall of Fame. With Gibson, Leonard formed one of the most powerful tandems in any baseball league. He was known as “the Lou Gehrig of the Negro Leagues." Text on the 5.5" x 16.5” display panel, which presents a die-cut b&w photo 10” tall, says: “A HEAVENLY TWIN - Walter ‘Buck’ Leonard was one of the Homestead Grays’ ‘Heavenly Twins.’ He and Josh Gibson were accorded celestial status for their hitting and fielding. Leonard joined the Grays at age 26 in 1934, and played for them for 17 years, during which the team won nine straight Negro National League pennants. No team in any league has ever bettered that pennant streak. Leonard posted a .328 career batting average.” The source of the panel is the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center. The panel is ex with a couple of scratches on the text portion and a scuff and light indentations on the b&w photo of Leonard. It comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner.
Winning Bid $25     


Lot 308.  Pop Lloyd Exhibit Panel from the National Sports Gallery at the MCI Center. Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977, Lloyd was one of the greats of the Negro Leagues and, to many who saw him play, of baseball period. The panel, 5.5" x 16.5” with a 10” tall b&w die-cut photo, tells the story: “WAGNER’S PEER - John Henry ‘Pop’ Lloyd was called the ‘black Honus Wagner.’ Wagner called it honor to be compared to Lloyd, and major league team owner Connie Mack said, ‘You could put Wagner and Lloyd in a bag together and whichever one you pulled out, you couldn’t go wrong.’ Lloyd was playing for the Havana Reds in 1910 when the Detroit Tigers toured Cuba. The teams met, and Lloyd out-batted Ty Cobb in an exhibition series, .500 to .370. Lloyd played baseball until he was 58.” The panel is vg-ex; a half-dozen small scuffs reveal white below the red background of the panel, and the tip of Lloyd’s bat shows damage. From the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001, it comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center.
Winning Bid $20     


Lot 309.  Satchel Paige Display Panel Used in the National Sports Gallery at the MCI Center. The panel, 5.5" x 16.5” wide with a b&w photo up to 10.5” tall, describes Paige this way: “Young Leroy Paige carried train passengers’ luggage on a pole across his shoulders; friends said he looked like a satchel tree. Grownup fastball pitcher “Satchel” Paige carried showmanship into the game. He roused crowds with bold moves such as calling in the outfield and closing an inning with infielders only. Paige was the major leagues’ oldest rookie when he joined the Cleveland Indians in 1948, and he pitched in a major league game at age 65, allowing only one hit in three innings.” He was among the first three players from the Negro Leagues enshrined in the Hall of Fame. The exhibit panel is from the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. It comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner. Ex-m. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center.
Winning Bid $50     


Lot 310.  Exhibit Panel of Toni Stone, the First Woman to Play in a Professional Major League. In 1953, Stone batted .243 while playing second base for the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro American League. She is in the Women’s Sports Hall of Fame. The display featuring Stone is 5.5" x 18.5” wide with a b&w 10.5” x 11” photo. From the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001, the panel is ex-m with a scratch away from the text. It comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner. The panel provides this description of Stone: “LIFETIME LOVE - Toni Stone, born Marenia Lyle, changed her name when she moved from Minnesota to San Francisco. There she played baseball first for an American Legion team, the black barnstorming San Francisco Sea Lions. She changed teams several times, signing with the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro American League in 1953. On that squad she became the first - and the only - woman to play in a professional major league. After her pro career she returned to the sandlot play she’d loved as a child, and played to the age of 60.”
Winning Bid $20     


Lot 311.  Moses Fleetwood Walker – Major League Baseball’s First Black Player – Exhibit Panel. The panel, 5.5" x 16.5” wide with a b&w photo 6” x 10”, was displayed at the MCI National Sports Gallery in Washington, D.C. It comes from the estate of Frank Ceresi, who served as curator and executive director of the gallery, which closed in 2001. The panel provides this brief history of Walker’s life and career: “SIGNS OF THE TIMES - A catcher’s signals tell the pitcher what pitch to deliver. But Moses Fleetwood Walker’s signals to the Toledo Blue Stockings pitcher were ignored - because the pitcher was white. In 1884 Walker had become the major leagues’ first black player; his brother Welday was the second. But there were no more until Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, as club owners held to a ‘gentlemen’s agreement’ to keep black players out of the big leagues.” Cap Anson was among the white players who led the charge to keep Walker and as many as 50 other black players out of professional baseball. After baseball, Walker ran a newspaper and opera house in Ohio. He became an advocate for black emigration to Africa. The panel is vg+ to ex with some scratches on the red display portion and scuffs, primarily along the edge, on the photo. The panel comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner.
Winning Bid $30     


Lot 312.  National Sports Gallery Display Panel of HoF Pitcher Smokey Joe Williams. Under the title “THROWING SMOKE,” the panel reports that “Joseph ‘Smokey Joe’ Williams threw pitches so hard that his team had to change catchers every four or five innings because their hands swelled from the impact. Known as ‘Smokey Joe’ in the East, fans and players in the West called him ‘Cyclone Joe.’ Both nicknames were born from his blistering pitch. The durable pitcher’s career stretched from the turn of the century through 1932, and he played for several Negro National League teams.” The panel is ex-m+ and 5.5" x 16.5” wide with a b&w photo 4.75” wide and 11” tall. It comes from the estate of Frank Ceresi, curator and executive director of the MCI National Sports Gallery until it closed in 2001. Located in Washington, D.C., the MCI Center is now the Verizon Center. The panel comes with a letter of authenticity from Carol McMains, Ceresi's long-time business partner.
Winning Bid $15     




 »   Next: Lots 313 to 314



 





 
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